Exercise Is For The Strong Minded

If someone where to tell you that exercise is good for you, what would your response be? I’m sure it’s something you’ve heard plenty of times or is something you are fully aware of. But are we staying on top of our own commitments or do they simply get swept under the rug and forgotten?

Many people do not exercise regularly but even more do not exercise at all. Those same people wish they could shed a few pounds. So what’s the problem?

When we were children and were up and running, we couldn’t stay still no matter how much we tried. Our stamina was high and our energy levels were through the roof, but of course that’s what being a kid is all about. The older we get the more exhausted our minds become, thus our willingness to actively get up and go for a run. For most people, this exhaustion begins when we start college due to academic demands and lack of organized sports. We have the tendency of looking at life changes as an occasion to blow up the old rules and not replace them with new ones. This is especially so when it comes to getting fit since college is our first big transition in life and becomes an excuse to not exercise.

The pattern of excuses and exhaustion goes on wheel of repetitiveness caused by a high stressed job, new relationship or even starting a family. Many people don’t like to exercise which is why it is the first thing to go when you get the opportunity to rearrange your schedule.

Researchers have linked the issue to psychology and that self control is like a psychological muscle and that can become exhausted. Every day life challenges can make it hard to maintain your composer and you have no discipline left to stick to your fitness routine. A routine diet can also exhaust your self-control muscle when trying to keep yourself from eating something you want but cannot have.

In addition not having a defined exercise routine plan can affect you too. Simple changes to routine can make a huge difference with just a little a day. Having someone for support can help motivate you but no longer having the person there can make you dependable on that person to stick to your workout routine and will decrease your chances of self-efficacy.

3 valuable tips to staying active:

  1. Have a plan (a specific commitment to job three days a week, for example, is better than a general resolve to “exercise more”)
  2. Stay firm (a life change like a new job or a new baby is a great excuse to quit exercising. Don’t fall for it)
  3. Don’t overdo the trainer (a little coaching is nice, but your need to develop the self efficacy to keep exercising on your own)